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the president of the united states is on the ground in afghanistan. of course, we are in afghanistan because the attacks of 9/11 and now we know that president obama is meeting with afghanistan's president karzai, an unannounced and secret visit until this moment. some describe the relationship between our president and president karzai as "complicated." which could be the unstatement of the day. casey in point: a u.s. government released yesterday. new details of the level of corruption in afghanistan. and the unthinkable waste of billions upon billions of american tax dollars. officials in afghanistan are stealing american money according to the report. the afghan attorney general's office avoids prosecuting high profile corruption cases among other things. that's the situation as the president is on the ground if afghanistan our chief white house correspondent is at the white house. did you get any idea of this? and what do we expect to accomplish? >>reporter: the president's schedule was wide open all day leaving the possibility that he could have been going s
>>> 30 minutes from now the president of the united states will address the american people. >> welcome to cnn's breaking news coverage of president obama's surprise visit to afghanistan. the president will be telling us about the new strategic partnership agreement he has just signed with afghanistan's president outlining the relationship between the united states and afghanistan after the withdrawal of u.s. forces at the end of 2014. white house officials tell us the timing was driven by the negotiations over that agreement at an upcoming nato summit. critics will say it is about politics. everyone knows today is the anniversary of the raid in pakistan that killed osama bin laden. on the ground, do people there -- are they aware that president obama is on the ground? >> reporter: late in the afternoon the sun went down there was a report on afghan media suggesting that he was already in kabul. since then we have seen absolute silence across the city occasionally by helicopters and that is presumably some part of the president in and out of the capital. the speech we are ab
in the time i have been here. the french socialists are not strangers for the united states. they shouldn't be strangers. it has been true that it has been 17 years since the socialists were in power at the presidency. of course, they ran the government about a decade ago when spauo was in power. we have always had a very good relationship with any government that is there in france. i am confident we will have a good relationship with this government in france. we do have to see how this government is going to deal with the issues of the day. it's one thing to be campaigning. it is always something different to be governing. it is not me. it is not my job to predict how this will evolve. i will note that francoi francois hollande campaigned to keep france in the military structure. that was a remarkable statement after nicolas sarkozy to come back into the structure. i think france learned in the libya operation that being integrated in the command structure gives you a voice and say over what happens in the internal affairs of the military operation. that's important. you learn there ar
's also something going on in the united states but in the united states that process takes on a much different context, and the main reason for that is that in the u.s. you have universal white male suffrage by 1820 unlike in europe where it is france and the 1870s and other countries later on, in the u.s. you have basically full mass democracy very early on and you have it before most immigrants he show up, so when the immigrants begin to be integrated into american society and particularly when they begin to be integrated into american politics, they're being integrated into a much different world than are those immigrants that we talked about in europe. so what i want to do today is talk about how the united states begins to develop a plurist philosophy, a pleuralist vision and i want to trace the roots back to the way politics worked in 19th century america. i have here just to give you a sense of the kind of politics we're talking about, an image from harper's weekly in 1858, around election time or just after election time, in 1858 and shows a saloon and a polling place. they d
connolly looks at pluralism in the united states. this 1:15 class took place at ball state university in indiana. >>> on tuesday in class, we looked at the social question in europe. and one of the things we talk about was the ways in which european governments attempted to appease the working classes, alleviate their concerns, reduce social tension. one of the tools they used was mass politics, as we talked about. that's also something that's going on in the united states. but in the united states, that process takes on a much different context. the main reason for that is that in the u.s., you have universal white male suffrage by 1820. unlike in europe where it is france and the 1870s and other countries later on, in the u.s. you have basically full mass democracy very early on and you have it before most immigrants show up, so when the immigrants begin to be integrated into american society and particularly when they begin to be integrated into american politics, they're being integrated into a much different world than are those immigrants that we talked about in europe. so what
the united states and europe remain each other's best parkhurst and that when the american president or european leader looks how the public and says pudu one call when there's a problem of the person on the other side of the cleantech. my judgment is that is not going to change anytime soon partly because of the affinity of interest of the values and also there aren't other options and even though there are emerging countries out your waist count on our european allies and to rely on our european allies more than we can count on a cost-cutting. at the same time i think it's clear that we are at the cusp of a major historic transition in the global landscape in which the world that nato represents his losing the primacy it enjoyed the last 200 years and if you look at the share of global product represented by nato and i would include japan because they are a part of the western world since world war ii we've gone from roughly 70% of the global product to 50% and we are headed towards 40% and that says to me the big security question of the day are about how we are going to manage th
trade of the united states. and less than 2 point something of russian foreign trade. which suggests in turn that neither united states nor russia are to each other an important economic partner. just for example with our neighbor in ukraine our trade is 20% higher. with eu it is -- it is almost ten times hyper. -- ten times higher. so what it means, it means we are missing a good economic underpinning for political relations. and that leaves them still vulnerable to the politics of the day, to the crisises of the day, and, and unnecessarily so. we certainly have a lot of things that we have in common in terms of challenges that we face. and i, once drew a list of things that unite us. it appears much longer. we don't see eye to eye. and i would submit important for russia and hopefully for the united states. we have progress aid lot through the last three years. reset has brought a lot of new things, a lot of new way of doing things. the commission that was established by the two presidents seems to be producing new ideas, new avenues for, for cooperation, both between the
the united states and afghanistan over the next decade. and will include sort of the outline for the withdrawal plan. we expect the president to address the nation and u.s. troops at 7:31 our time. that's a speech that will last for about 10 to 15 minutes, martin. and we will, of course, be carrying that live. president obama has arrived in afghanistan. he is meeting with afghanistan president hamid karzai. of course, this all comes on the one-year anniversary of the killing of osama bin laden. certainly this timing is not coincidental but president obama there to discuss the strategic partnership with the president of afghanistan, including the plan for withdrawal. >> and do you know anything or any detail yet about how this was carried out? because we knew absolutely nothing about it. the president clearly leaving the white house. i mean, i'm assuming that somebody must have known. what do we know about the detail of that? >> well, we know that of course, senior administration officials were aware of this plan. but the white house certainly keeping this a secret throughout
talks hit major snags. surprise, surprise, the negotiators rejected plans by the united states and five other world powers to curb the rogue nation's nuclear program. iran also insisted it had a right to enrich uranium accusing other nations of creating a "difficult atmosphere for talks." yesterday, officials pointed to signs that iran would be open to an agreement restarting nuclear inspections, but as the talks draw to a close, there is no sign of a deal. u.s. and other world leaders accusative ran of using the program as a cover for building a nuclear bomb. iran claims the program is for peaceful purposes only. and steve is live if us today in baghdad. steve? >>reporter: well, we are getting more details of some of the main goals for the negotiators for the sex -- six powers, with a main goal for iran to stop producing highly enriched uranium. this is the kind of material that can be developed very quickly into fuel for use in a nuclear weapon. >> iran's declared readiness to address the issue of 20 percent enrichment and came with its own five-point plan including their assertion th
in this field. september 11th hijackers used united states and foreign financial institutions to hold, move, and retrieve their money. they deposited money into united states accounts via wire transfers and depp sits of traveler's checks and cash that was brought from overseas. they kept funds in foreign accounts which they accessed through atmst and credit card transactions in the home land. according to the september 11th commission, the plot cost al qaeda somewhere in the range of $400,000 to $500,000, of which approximately $300,000 passed through the hijackers' bank casualties here in the united states. after the attacks, the united states publicly declared that the fight against al qaeda financing was as critical as the fight against al qaeda itself. the charge of the united states intelligence and law enforcement communities was clear -- if we choke off the terrorists' money, we limit their ability to conduct mass casualty attacks. within months of the attacks, the department of defense, the fbi, the cia, and perhaps most importantly the department of treasury launched a swift and un
that people take a look at peel's previous statements. the united states has conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden. >> we have breaking news at this very moment. we understand the president is in afghanistan. this on the first anniversary of the killing of osama bin laden. we understand that he traveled there overnight. there was something of a "meet the press" and media blackout but we are able to confirm the president is indeed in afghanistan. i'm joined now by kristen welker who is at the white house. please tell us what do you know? what have you heard? >> hi there. good afternoon to you. we can tell you that president obama arrived in afghanistan in kabul at 2:39 p.m. our time, which is 11:09 in afghanistan. right now, he is at the afghan presidential palace with president hamid karzai. we're just getting this information so i'll read it to you. he is there to sign the strategic partnership agreement which is essentially going to outline the relationship between the united states and afghanistan over the next decade. and will include sort of the outline for the wit
century a pluralist philosophy and explanation of what the united states was like. now, basically just there is a lot of different ways to define and understand pluralism and so just for our purposes of fairly straight forward and basic definition of it is a vision of in this case the united states as a country with many different cultures, many different ethnic groups and there isn't one single american identity that everyone has to subscribe to in every way. another way to think about it is the way in which immigrants could identify themselves. they could identify themselves in hyphenated terms as irish american, polish american and italian american and what i want to do today is get at the roots of that identity, the roots of the development of that conception of what the united states is. we're to do it by going through three different sections, three different sets of developments. the first is going to be the world of party politics like the image we just looked at from the period from about 1840 to the end of the 19th century. it is a period when there is very stiff competition
front of the u.s. capitol, this is half an hour. >> ladies and gentlemen, the president of united states. >> detail, colors. present arms. [silence] >> detail, color guard, right shoulder, order. arm. >> please stand for the assessment of the colors like united states capitol police, and remain standing for our national anthem. [silence] >> detail, color guar guard. present arms. >> we will now have the national anthem by kathy williams. ♪ oh, say, can you see ♪ by the dawn's early light ♪ what so proudly we hailed ♪ at the twilight's last gleaming? ♪ ♪ whose broad stripes and bright stars ♪ ♪ thro' the perilous fight ♪ o'er the ramparts we watched ♪ were so gallantly streaming t ♪ and the rockets red glare ♪ the bombs bursting in air ♪ gave proof through the night ♪ that our flag was still there ♪ ♪ oh, say, does that star-spangled banner yet wave ♪ ♪ o'er the land of the free ♪ and the home of the brave? >> detail, color guard. order, right shoulder, arms. >> please remain standing for the invocation. >> please join me in prayer. our gracious fathe
the gaithersburg book festival we hear from david stew wetter on the third vice president of the united states. his called everyone emperor. he he's introduced by john ashman the founder of the gaithersburg book festival. >> surveys are available at the tend. we hope you enjoy the rest of of your day at the festival. [inaudible conversations] good afternoon, everyone. welcome to the third annual gaithersburg book festival. i'm judd ashman a member of the city council. oop. i hope everyone is all right over there. [inaudible conversations] it is a i have i vibrant diversity that celebrates the support of the cultural arts. we're pleased to bring the event free of charge thanks to the generous support of our sponsors. for our consideration and everyone here, i should say, please silence any devices that make any kind of noise at all. in order keep improving the event. we want your feedback. please grab a survey from the table over here. from the info booth it'll be up on the website as of later today. please help us keep improving the event. if there's time for qa please come to the microphone with t
in the history of trade and taxation in the united states and is the author of several scholarly works, 19th and 20th tariff policy. long a civil war buff, his attention turned to the presidency of abraham lincoln after a fortuitous discovery at library of congress. the find marked the beginning of a four year hunt for documents culminating in his book, co-authored with sebastian page, lincoln and the movement for black resettlement. in addition to writing, dr. magnus is an academic programs director at the institute for humane studies at george mason university, also taught in public administration at american university, and international tragtional trade . also in his biography, something i find fascinating. he is an avid scuba diver. and plays underwater hockey. for the washington, d.c., and i love this name -- beltway bottom feeders. there is probably no end of applicants for that team. after dr. magnus makes his presentation, rodney ross will come to read a poem of -- of john willis menard that is very appropriate. actually there are copies, print copies of it on the table outside. rod
. as the president said, preventing a nuclear iran is in the interest of the united states. we have issued reports, and the most recent one was issued on and.ary 1 and it includes a distinguished panel of four democratic members of congress, admirals' and generals and also experts to area our last report supported the view that the best approached to this challenge is a simultaneous pursuit of a triple track policy, which is of diplomacy, tough sanctions, and a credible and invisible military threat. we also issued a white paper on each of those tracks. i want to highlight one recommendation on each of those tracks, and then i will change it over to mort zuckerman. and the military threat we believe the united states should boost the credibility of its military to air around us nuclear facilities, and we have spelled out how to do so. one element has been selling bunker busters' to israel. we do not advocate an israeli strike, but this will send a strong signal to tehran to negotiate in good faith, encourage other states that the alternative to supporting u.s. sanctions could be military conflict
in history the united states needs latin america more than latin america needs the united states? now, cast your mind back a decade ago or little over a decade ago. that question would have seemed absurd. the united states was the undisputed heavyweight champion of the world, the most powerful country economically, politically, militarily. why on earth would it need anyone, let alone a continent known for its economic crises, its political instability, for having almost no global clout? well, how times have changed. and how used we we have become o the fact of change. there's an old jewish joke that i heard probably about 5,000 times when i was growing up, and it's set in eastern europe in the 19th century in a period when borders were changing very rapidly. and the story goes that a woman is pegging up washing, and a kazakh soldier rides up and declares, old woman, from this day forth, this land is no longer poland, it is imperial russia. and then he rides off. and she watches him go, and she says, thank god, i couldn't stand another polish winter. [laughter] thank you for laughing. i'll p
. and in relation to the united states government, whether it is the clinton administration or bush administration or obama administration, they're probably better understood stood more like francement they're sometime as lined with the united states, sometimes o posed. postly they are just trying to stay out of the way and do their own thing. >> ann bremmer and steve coll when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following: . >> rose: additional funding provided by these funders:. >> and by bloomberg:. >> from studios in new york city captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: ian bremmer is here president of eurasia group, his new book every nation for itself, winners and losers in a g-zero world t paints a picture in a world in which no single power is able to take be the responsibility of global leadership. larry summers says everyone who cares about our collective future will need to carefully consider this book's impressive arguments. i'm pleased to have ian bremmer back at this table, welcome. >> hi, cha
geopolitics -- host: oil and gas production in the western hemisphere is booming, with the united states emerging less dependent on supplies from an unstable middle east. vens, nigeria, and mexico. host: southeast michigan. what are gas prices like there, dave? caller: very good. someone saying on your show that prices were falling for the holidays. that's not true here in southeast michigan, which people here like to drive a lot up north. we have a wonderful, beautiful up north. but the prices here average in the low $3.90's. they were a week ago in the mid $3.60, around there. for my employees, it's all the same for them. we're traveling 60 mile an hour round trips and that really hits the pocketbook when you're having to travel every day for week. i'll companies are certainly quick to bring the price down. thanks and have a good holiday. host: it's not our oil that we're talking about, it belongs to oil companies. new hampshire, john on our democrats line joins us. hi. caller: just one note i've acknowledged over the last few weeks. we have a caller on your show, but he was discussing
playing days. >>> we're in danger. the words of chen guangcheng now begging the united states to allow his family to board hillary clinton's plane to america. >>> would you pay $1,500 for a piece of stale cake? "cnn newsroom" starts right now. we do begin this hour with breaking news. with a rare and startling look inside the mind of osama bin laden. right now the public is getting its first look at documents seized in the raid that killed the al qaeda mastermind. they are in his own words. and they capture a fading leader desperate to launch another catastrophic strike on the united states. hundreds and hundreds of pages are now appearing on the website of combatting terrorism center at west point. peter bergen is our national security expert and was given early access to this so-called treasure-trove of material. what's been your biggest take away? >> i was able to review some of the documents that are being released today in the course of reporting a book i have written on the hunt for bin laden. the take aways clearly don't have operational information that would be useful to the cia a
, this is in the security interests of the united states. over the past four years we of issued four report . the most recent was on february 1. as jason indicated, it included a distinguished panel of democratic members of congress, three retired generals and admirals, and distinguished foreign policy and energy experts. the last report reinforced the view we have always held is that the best approach to this crisis is a simultaneous pursuit of a triple track policy, which is diplomacy, tough sanctions, and credible, in visible military threat, and also, we issued a white paper in the past couple of months on each of those tracks. i will quickly highlight one recommendation on each of those, and then i will turn it over to mort zuckerman. sanctions, the progress of the nuclear program to determine the degree to which sanctions are forcing iran to slow down the clear development. we believe the united states should boost the credibility of its own and israel's military threat to iran as a nuclear facility. we have spelled out how to do so, and one element has been selling israel bunker busters' and ae
is canc not just here in the united states, but within afghanistan. you know, being able to come to president karzai and sign this agreement and show the afghan people the united states is going to remain engaged in the region and send a compelling message to nair neighbors that have meddled in their appars on affair, pakistan next door, the united states will be here and continue to try to help afghanistan move forward. >> thank you pj for joining us inside the war room. that is pj crowley former assist isant to the secretary of state of affairs. of and here to discuss the strategic interests of the trip and a little politics is the assistant secretary of defense for global strategic affairs in the obamaa administration and former dean of the goldman school of policy, professor doctor, thank you so much for joining us inside the war room. you heard what pj crowley said about the agreement. do you agree with the three goals you think were identified in that? and how important is the strategic interests of that agr
of death in latin america. does the scary parasitic disease pose a growing threat here in the united states? >>> and a runway emergency in chicago where a giant cargo jet collides with an airliner. we'll bring you the very latest. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> president obama telephones mitt romney, congratulates him for going over the top in the republican delegate count and over the top comments with supporter donald trump has created a distraction. you've heard trump question the birthplace in "the situation room," now romney is trying to move on. here's our national political correspondent, jim acosta. >> wolf, mitt romney has left las vegas, but donald trump is refusing to leave the campaign stage. >> americans are tired of being tired. >> now that he's crunched the number of delegates to win the gop nomination, it's victory lap time for mitt romney. get the checkered flag this new romney campaign video is all about the stars and stripes. >> we're united by one great, overwh overwhelming passion. we love america. we believe
united states senator, a former vice president of the united states, an experienced nationally known sober steady republican named richard nix on is running for president. he wins in 1968. he wins re-election in 1972. he never makes it to the end of the second term because of a little complication called watergate. in 1968 he was at the height of his appeal and he was a communist. see his campaign slogan, forward together. this is from the republican national committee archives. see the slogan at the bottom. bushy haired richard nixon communist. the reason you know that slogan indicates he's a communist because today's conservatives say so. i thought this was debunked already but conservatives even know, this is from last night on glenn beck's internet tv show, conservatives are still stuck on this. president obama's web video that came out ended with this slogan forward. the right just went nuts that the word forward was the obama campaign's way of signaling that it is marxist. it seems to impose the economic system by karl marx on america. that president obama is a communist, that
book, "crusade 2.0", which is about islamic phobia and its effects in the united states, studied by city life, great press. and instead of reading from the book, i thought it was just a presentation for you and for part. the four parts are going to be a visit, a palm, and e-mail and then finally a political ad. let's start with this. a couple weeks ago i went to new york city have visited park 51, an interesting islamic cultural center. and there he saw the different programs they have available. they teach error back, calligraphy. they have a course on capillary, a brazilian martial art. it was a fascinating, it occurs to me, you might not know what i'm talking about because you might not recognize part 51, the action name part 51 because you might be more familiar with the name that was used in the media to describe park 51, which is of course the ground zero mosque. it was two years ago that this islamic cultural center, not a mosque in knoxville is located at ground zero, but several blocks away became the focus of the great controversy. i don't know if you remember that two
the men and women who is died defending the united states in the first memorial day since the end the iraq war. the president laid a wreath at arlington national cemetery before saying all men and women who have fought and sacrificed their lives for the united states have the very same connection. listen. >> while their stories could be separated by hundreds of years and thousands of miles, they rest here. together. side-by-side. row by row. each of them loved this country. and everything it stands for. more than life itself. >>trace: the president vowed to take care of the troop whose make him heavy long after their service is over and moments ago the president held a ceremony at vietnam memorial as we showed you to mark the start of a 13 year project to honor the 50-year anniversary of the vietnam war. and now to ed live at the white house. ed the ceremony at wall was a long time coming for many vietnam veterans. >> it was. and that's because of the fact that when many of the vietnam veterans came home those fortunate enough to come home because over 58,000 who died during that conflict,
in latin america. many people are infected. what kind of threat does it pose in the united states? actually, the milk from my farm makes it so creamy, right dad. dad can see... boys! don't you think ouffer's steam perfect bag should get some credit? my carrots. my milk. [ female announcer ] new from stouffer's. farmers' harvest steam meals taste so good we'll bet the farm on it. oh, yeah? [ chris ] you can call us 24-7, get quotes online, start a claim with our smartphone app. you name it, we're here, anytime, anywhere, any way you want it. that's the way i need it. any way you want it. [ man ] all night? all night. every night? any way you want it. that's the way i need it. we just had ourselves a little journey moment there. yep. [ man ] saw 'em in '83 in fresno. place was crawling with chicks. i got to go. ♪ any way you want it ♪ that's the way you need it ♪ any way you want it ♪ ♪ any way you want it last season was the gulf's best tourism season in years. in florida we had more suntans... in alabama we had more beautiful blooms... in mississippi we had more good t
of -- linked to the regulatory agency of bethesda, so that is something we have in the united states and from the accounts that i read about the accident fukushima, the communications hinders the efficient and effective accident response at the sight. >> i would say that katrina, we had in the gulf area, a complete destruction of infrastructure. we hear the term inoperaablety, there was none. no cell towers, land lines, nothing. and so, the situational awareness on the ground was very poor. we did not know what was going on on the ground. and so, i remember sitting specifically at the white house and watching on tv, trying to figure out what's going on on the ground and we had so much conflicting information. you never know which information to trust and which not to trust. in the case of katrina, we did not have any official channels of information. we didn't hear anything through the local emergency managers, the state emergency managers because they did not have power and communications. so that was a major challenge and something that's been resolved. sounds like both in japan and the uni
states. hispanic children are at the highest level of poverty in the history of the united states. i think the challenge is not how to bring them over to immigration reform or dialogue. just to make sure the latino community knows these facts and understands the failure of president obama. >> i agree with you there is a lot of ammunition. these comments about self deportation have indicated to some in the community he does not have respect for them. go to south texas and talk to latino ranch and farm owners and small businesses and members of the hispanic community. they are hard asses because they are the first to feel the adverse affect. cartels are shooting at them. are competing for jobs. there are a lot of reasons why they are hard asses but they do want to know the presidential candidate has respect for the community and in recognition this is not all a mexican problem. half the people here illegally came from hong kong the, nigeria on a visa and overstating it. the fact that all the people from central america are unworthy is a real problem. >> thank you. >> we will get behind
million people live in the united states. and each person uses an average of 100 gallons of water every day. man: what it takes to actually make clean water is somewhat a mystery to most customers. woman: so how does water get from the river into your house, or here at school? woman: somebody has to bring that water to us, and somebody has to take it away when we're finished with it. man: the water infrastructure is vital for disease protection, fire protection, basic sanitation, economic development, and for our quality of life. man: you just can't visualize all the assets that are under our feet. we have about two million miles of pipe in this nation. if you're walking around in an urban area, you're probably stepping on a pipe. man: our grandparents paid for, and put in for the first time, these large distribution systems. woman: and in many cases, it's not been touched since. man: we're at a critical turning point. much of that infrastructure is wearing out. narrator: our water infrastructure is made up of complex, underground systems that function continuously. these 10 locations t
states attorneys office and in particular the united states attorney in connecticut overall as well as on this case are doing extraordinarily excellent work, and i'm very proud of the great job that they're doing there, and i say that as one who would be critical having been a former -- having been a united states attorney, i'm not one who would be less than demanding of that office, but they're doing, both the fbi and the u.s. attorney there are doing great work. >> i'm familiar with the investigation. we cannot in open session discuss it. >> on gasoline prices, do you know any uptick in criminal activity there with respect to price gouging? >> have not. have not. again, that's something i'll have to get back to you on. we may have seen something. i would have to go back and find out where we are on that. >> thank you. again, thank you for your great work. my time has expired and i appreciate you being there. >> thank you. >> thank you very much. we'll yield now to senator graham and i would ask senator blumenthal if he's willing to take the chair. i'm going to somebody else again,
to -- to the 209,145 soldiers and officers that were officially mustered into the bureau of the united states troops. attention was brought to how these soldiers were organized, how they fought, and what they accomplished in the civil war. attention was brought to an african descent community that fought to save the union and free themselves by enforcing the emancipation proclamation. attention was brought to -- to an organized community that planned for and executed that plan to end the tyranny of slavery and lead with the constitution and to gain the rights of citizens in league with the constitution, attention was brought to one of the best kept secrets in american history. now if the overt story of the soldiers and sailors, guides, scouts, spies, nurses, was -- was one of the best kept secrets in american history. then the covert story is a secret within a secret. within the best kept secret. and when we talk about women in the civil war, african descent women in the civil war that is another layer of one of those best kept secrets in american history. one of those untold stories. tonight
with the president of the united states. but a lot of americans as you know, and you look at american public opinion polls, they're concerned that they want the u.s. out of afghanistan, about 70% say it's time for the u.s. to come home, the u.s. is spending to keep 90,000 troops, $2 billion a week in afghanistan, $100 billion a year. why is this money well spent? >> we have already agreed on a process of transition to afghan authority whereby afghanistan will be looking after itself and after its security and the defense of the country almost entirely by 2014, and that's also the time that the american forces and other forces will withdraw from afghanistan. that transition and the eventual withdrawal in 2014 of the u.s. forces and other nato forces from afghanistan is good for afghanistan and good for our allied countries. today we discussed that. we have finalized plans. so 2014 will be a year in which the united states will not be spending as much money in afghanistan as it is spending today. it will save money and we will be providing security ourselves. >> but for another two and a half years un
.se it really is a question of thestioof future economic policy of the united states. un that's what we're talking aboutre here today. tay i just. heard the republican leader say there is no budget. i really -- i don't know how to say this.es sometimes i wonder if colleagues pay attention to what they're here. voting on here. last in here in august we didn't pass a budget resolution pass a budget resolution. instead, we passed in a resolution is purely a congressional it never goes toresident the president for his signature has to pass both bodies and be signed by the president. last year, instead of a budget resolution, we did a budget law called the budget control act. the budget control act set the budget for the next two years for this year and next. more than that, it set ten years of spending caps, saving $900 billion. madam president in addition, the budget control act gave a special committee the authority to reform the tax system and the entitlement system of the country and it said if you come to an agreement special committee, your action cannot be filibustered. you have to
viewers in the united states and around the world. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." >>> the historic headline from the white house this week, the president of the united states endorses same-sex marriage. but the story behind the headlines may be just as dramatic and it culminated with vice president joe biden apologizing to president obama for forcing his hand on this hot button issue, a sore subject among some white house insiders. our chief whereas correspondent jessica yellen has been working the story for us. tell our viewers what you are hearing right now. >> i understand the vice president apologized to the president for putting him in a tough position on this situation and the president gave an understanding reply saying he knows that the vice president was speaking from the heart. the vice president's office also issued a statement saying it was the president who has been the leader on this issue since day one and the vice president never intended to distract from that. president obama says he was planning to say this sometime before the democratic convent
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